Photos


The Vehicles of the 4th Canadian Armoured Division, of which the Lake Superior Regiment was a part, can be seen here crossing a pontoon bridge over the Seine river near Elboeuf, France, 28 August 1944.
Photo courtesy of National Archives of Canada PA-113662.



A Canadian convoy advancing through Fontenay-le-Marmion, France, 14 August 1944.
Photo courtesy of National Archives of Canada PA-113657.



The Universal Carrier of the Lake Superior Regiment (the 4th Canadian Armoured Division) at Cintheaux, France, 8 August, 1944. Highly mobile, these carriers ran ahead of the heavier armour, clearing the way. Thus they were often first into battle. They were the outstretched arm of the armoured division.
Photo courtesy of National Archives of Canada PA-113651.



The entry of the 4th Canadian Armoured Division in Deldon, Netherlands, 4 April 1945. Lake Superior Regiment troops remember the joy the people of Holland expressed when liberated: “There were hugs and kisses for all.”
Photo courtesy of National Archives of Canada PA-113691.



The “Sherman” tanks of the 4th Canadian Armoured Division crossing the Twenthe Canal near Almelo, Netherlands, 4 April 1945. The Lake Superior Regiment was heavily involved in the capture of Almelo.
Photo courtesy of National Archives of Canada PA-113690.



In this obviously posed publicity photograph, Lieutenant Roy Styffe of the Lake Superior Regiment instructs Universal Carrier crews at Aldershot, England, 25 November 1942.
Photo courtesy of National Archives of Canada PA-113642.



The Officers of the 96th District of Algoma Battalion of Rifles in the 1880s or early 1890s. Col. Samuel Wellington Ray is the man with the beard seated at centre. Officers had to buy their own uniforms, which accounts for the mixture of styles demonstrated here.
Photo courtesy of The Thunder Bay Historical Museum Society.



The arrival of the 52nd Battalion, the Lake Superior Regiment, at Port Arthur, 29 March 1919. Having just returned from overseas, they are greeted here by a large contingent of well-wishers.
Photo courtesy of The Thunder Bay Historical Museum Society.


Captain Christopher John Patrick O’Kelly of the 52nd Battalion received the Victoria Cross for bravery in action at Passchendaele, 26 October 1917. He was only 20 years old. The regiment’s Honours and Awards book details this account of his action:
“Captain O’Kelly led his company with extraordinary skill and determination while advancing over 1,000 yards against the enemy under heavy fire without any artillery barrage. He took the enemy positions on a hill by storm and then personally organized and led a series of attacks against machine gun pill boxes. His compnay alone captured 10 machine guns and more than 100 prisoners. Later under the leadership of this gallant officer, his company repelled a strong counter attack, taking more prisoners. That night his company captured a hostile raiding party consisting of one officer and 10 men and a machi